Tsavo Bridge

In 1898, the British began building this bridge to cross the Tsavo River, but two man-eating lions kept eating the workers at night.  It was a very terrifying time, and eventually all of the workers went on strike.  The leader of the project, Lt. Col. Patterson, finally shot the lions, but the not before they had eaten over 100 victims.  This story was told in the book, The Man Eaters of Tsavo and again in the movie The Ghost and the Darkness with Val Kilmer (though the movie is a bit embellished.  The bridge was bombed during WW1 when the Germans were trying to destroy the railroad, but the pillars are original.  The lions’ skins were eventually stuffed and sent to the Museum of Natural History in Chicago, and are still there today.  This railroad in a very real sense created the modern country of Kenya.  The railway line runs from Mombasa on the coast to Lake Victoria in Uganda, and actually runs not 300 feet behind our house.  RVA’s location was chosen thanks to this railroad… but that’s a story for another time.

On our return drive, we passed a very un-populated part of Kenya and stopped to take a picture of this very famous bridge.  I will let you try and guess it’s story, and will tell you all about it in our next email.  Hint: This bridge is central to both a book and a moderately successful movie.

4 thoughts on “Tsavo Bridge

  1. DID CHARLES REMINGTON REALLY EXIST OR WAS HE JUST FOR MORE THRILLS & CHILLS HOLLYWOOD WISE? I LOVE THE MOVIE ANYWAY VAL KILMER & MICHAEL DOUGLAS DID A VERY EXCELLENT JOB OF BRINGING THIS TRUE STORY TO LIFE.:) THANK YOU FOR THE PICTURE OF THE BRIDGE I WANTED TO SEE WHAT IT LOOKED LIKE.

  2. Actually Remington was fictitious. I read that Hollywood wished to film on location, but Kenya wanted allot of taxes, so the film company went to South Africa for filming. They did take liberties with the story so you should read the book.

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